HOW TO PLAN YOUR APP DEMO VIDEO

App-Demo

10 Dec HOW TO PLAN YOUR APP DEMO VIDEO

Recently, I was asked by a client about producing some app demo training videos for his upcoming web app.  He asked how to best go about planning for several small videos that highlight individual features of the web app.  He then wanted to combine those videos into a curriculum of sorts on the company’s website.

His main concern was boring his clients with extremely long videos, which stemmed from the in person trainings that his company already conducts that typically last anywhere from 15-30 min.

 

THINGS TO THINK ABOUT

 

HOW LONG SHOULD THE VIDEO BE?

What you have to keep in mind when planning out such videos is that they will most definitely be much shorter than you think.

Rule of Thumb: You have a person’s attention for around 2 min (anything more you run the risk of losing them).

My client’s in person trainings were on the longer side because he stopped to answer questions.  Those frequent pauses can and do add up, and while you want to answer questions as they arise, you have other tools such as FAQ’s and User Forums to aid with that.

BITE SIZED INFORMATION

My client did have the right idea regarding breaking the whole presentation into individual “clips” where one clip = one topic/app feature.

Having bite sized clips helps your clients pick and choose which topics to learn about without having to sift through one long video presentation.

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT

Run through your presentation a couple of times.  Not only does practice make perfect but you will find out quickly what doesn’t work and what you can make better.

Your ears have a knack for spotting wordy/incoherent sentences when you say it out loud.

Any production company will be happy to help you through this process of fine tuning the presentation but save some money and do this part yourself.

Do this and you’re ready for production.

 

APP DEMO “THE OSFP WAY”

We will tackle this type of project in two parts:

 

PART I

We will record all of the screen action, i.e. mouse clicks, page changes, etc. in one fell swoop until it looks and flows the way you want it to.  This step is usually where the content gets culled as you start to see what is extraneous and what is not (See what I mean about saving money?).

“We record in the highest screen resolution possible so that calling attention to specific parts of the screen (Call Outs) can be added later.”

Call Outs are used as a way to draw the audience’s attention where you would like it to be.  Typical call outs are where the screen will zoom into a button or a mouse pointer to show the exact action taking place.  Another type of call out is when everything except what is being talked about is greyed out.

 

PART II

We will record the voice over while the screen action is being played.  This gives the person performing the voice over an idea of the correct pace as they can see on the screen what is happening as they say it.

The voice talent will usually be able to change pitch/tone/inflection to match the screen needs perfectly.

Alternatively, we do tend to work with remote voice actors who will provide multiple takes of each line to give you those same change possibilities.

 

FINAL PROCESS – “The Edit”

We will edit the two parts together and create the final video with Audio, Video, and Music (never hurts to have some music, keeps the video from sounding bland).

This process is the same whether you do each individual clip separately or you choose to do the entire training process and form the individual clips from that.  It’s entirely up to you.

Dominick Del Bosque
dominick@theosfp.com
No Comments

Post A Comment